2011'10.18.Tue

EXTENDED LENGTH DRAPES : EXTENDED LENGTH


EXTENDED LENGTH DRAPES : POP UP SHADE TENT.



Extended Length Drapes





extended length drapes






    extended
  • fully extended or stretched forth; "an extended telescope"; "his extended legs reached almost across the small room"; "refused to accept the extended hand"

  • elongated: drawn out or made longer spatially; "Picasso's elongated Don Quixote"; "lengthened skirts are fashionable this year"; "the extended airport runways can accommodate larger planes"; "a prolonged black line across the page"

  • Made larger; enlarged

  • Lasting longer than is usual or expected; prolonged

  • drawn-out: relatively long in duration; tediously protracted; "a drawn-out argument"; "an extended discussion"; "a lengthy visit from her mother-in-law"; "a prolonged and bitter struggle"; "protracted negotiations"





    length
  • the property of being the extent of something from beginning to end; "the editor limited the length of my article to 500 words"

  • the linear extent in space from one end to the other; the longest dimension of something that is fixed in place; "the length of the table was 5 feet"

  • duration: continuance in time; "the ceremony was of short duration"; "he complained about the length of time required"

  • The measurement or extent of something from end to end; the greater of two or the greatest of three dimensions of a body

  • The amount of time occupied by something

  • The quality of being long





    drapes
  • Adorn, cover, or wrap (someone or something) loosely with folds of cloth

  • (drape) the manner in which fabric hangs or falls; "she adjusted the drape of her skirt"

  • Arrange (cloth or clothing) loosely or casually on or around something

  • Let (oneself or a part of one's body) rest somewhere in a casual or relaxed way

  • (drape) arrange in a particular way; "drape a cloth"

  • (drape) curtain: hanging cloth used as a blind (especially for a window)











extended length drapes - The Extended




The Extended Phenotype: The Long Reach of the Gene (Popular Science)


The Extended Phenotype: The Long Reach of the Gene (Popular Science)



By the best selling author of The Selfish Gene 'This entertaining and thought-provoking book is an excellent illustration of why the study of evolution is in such an exciting ferment these days.' Science 'The Extended Phenotype is a sequel to The Selfish Gene ...he writes so clearly it could be understood by anyone prepared to make the effort' John Maynard Smith, London Review of Books 'Dawkins is quite incapable of being boring this characteristically brilliant and stimulating book is original and provocative throughout, and immensely enjoyable.' G. A. Parker, Heredity 'The extended phenotype is certainly a big idea and it is pressed hard in dramatic language.' Sydney Brenner, Nature 'Richard Dawkins, our most radical Darwinian thinker, is also our best science writer.' Douglas Adams 'Dawkins is a superb communicator. His books are some of the best books ever written on science.' Megan Tressider, Guardian 'Dawkins is a genius of science popularization.' Mark Ridley, The Times










77% (9)





The Everett Building




The Everett Building





Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States

The Everett Building is a sixteen-story commercial structure located on the northwest corner of East 17th Street and Park Avenue South. Named for Union Square's nineteenth-century Everett Hotel, and built in 1908 for the Everett Investing Company, it was designed by Goldwin Starrett & Van Vleck, a firm known for its commercial architecture.

It is a quintessential example of a building type defined by A. C. David (writing in Architectural Record in 1910): functional, fireproof, speedy to construct, while also demonstrating a concern for "architectural decency;" as such, this building is a uniquely American architectural expression. In its design, the Everett Building synthesizes classical elements with key aspects of both the New York and the Chicago styles; Goldwin Starrett was familiar with the Chicago style as a result of his years in Daniel Burnham's Chicago office.

The building reflects its structure in its cladding, while employing a design vocabulary that includes classical motifs. The Everett Building is prominently located on a site on the north side of Union Square and, together with the monumental Germania (now Guardian) Life Insurance Company Building directly across the avenue, forms an imposing terminus to Park Avenue South.

The Development of Union Square

The Commissioners Map of 1807-11, which first laid out the grid plan of Manhattan above Houston Street, allowed for certain existing thoroughfares to retain their original configuration. Bloomingdale Road, (now Broadway), and the Bowery intersected at 16th Street.

The acute angle formed by this "union" was set aside by the Commissioners and named Union Place.

Initially Union Place extended from 10th to 17th Streets, on land owned by the Manhattan Bank:

It then presented to the eye of the tourist and pedestrian a shapeless and ill-looking collection of lots, where garden sauce flourished — devoid of symmetry, and around which were reared a miserable group of shanties.

In 1815, the state legislature reduced the size of Union Place by making 14th Street its southern boundary. As the city expanded northward and land use intensified, the need for open spaces became apparent. A report drafted by the street committee in 1831 states the need for public squares "for purposes of military, and civic parades, and festivities, and ... to serve as ventilators to a densely populated city."

Designated a public space in 1832 at the urging of local residents, additional land was acquired so that the area could be regularized.

Graded, paved, and fenced, Union Place was finally opened to the public in July, 1839. Throughout much of its history, the square has been used for public gatherings, political rallies, and demonstrations.

By the 1850s, Union Square (as it came to be known) was completely surrounded by buildings including some of the city's most splendid mansions; but, "already by 1860, the dramatic march of commerce had begun." Theaters, hotels, and luxury retailers predominated in the 1870s. By the 1890s, the vestiges of the fashionable residential area, as well as the elegant stores and theaters, had been supplanted on Union Square by taller buildings that catered to the needs of publishers and manufacturers who had moved uptown.

The land on which the Everett Building stands was originally part of Cornelius Tiebout's farm. From 1853 on, the site was occupied by the Everett House, a hotel frequented by the singers and musicians performing at the new opera house, the Academy of Music (1854, architect Alexander Saeltzer).

Like the Belvedere and the Clarendon, hotels which were also demolished to make way for 'modern' office and loft buildings, the Everett House was razed to clear the site for the Everett Building.

The Everett Building is prominently situated on the northwest corner of East 17th Street and Union Square North, at the base of Park Avenue South (then called Fourth Avenue). Stations for major subway, surface, and "El" lines were close to the site, which was characterized by Real Estate Record & Guide in 1908 as "one of the most accessible locations for modern office buildings in the city."

Although when built, the Everett Building was associated with a possible transformation of Union Square to be effected by the construction of a new courthouse, the building was later seen as evidence of the concentration of the silk, woolen, cotton, and dry goods trades on Fourth Avenue, the area around the Square and lateral streets.

By September, 1910, about seventeen new loft and office buildings (generally restricted to office and salesroom needs, as opposed to manufacturing) had been erected, conveniently located near hotels and transportation.

In October 1911, Real Estate Record & Guide noted that "the Everett Building and those along the avenue, in which dry goods people are tenants, are all filled up.











The Everett Building




The Everett Building





Union Square, Manhattan, New York City, New York

The Everett Building is a sixteen-story commercial structure located on the northwest corner of East 17th Street and Park Avenue South. Named for Union Square's nineteenth-century Everett Hotel, and built in 1908 for the Everett Investing Company, it was designed by Goldwin Starrett & Van Vleck, a firm known for its commercial architecture.

It is a quintessential example of a building type defined by A. C. David (writing in Architectural Record in 1910): functional, fireproof, speedy to construct, while also demonstrating a concern for "architectural decency;" as such, this building is a uniquely American architectural expression. In its design, the Everett Building synthesizes classical elements with key aspects of both the New York and the Chicago styles; Goldwin Starrett was familiar with the Chicago style as a result of his years in Daniel Burnham's Chicago office.

The building reflects its structure in its cladding, while employing a design vocabulary that includes classical motifs. The Everett Building is prominently located on a site on the north side of Union Square and, together with the monumental Germania (now Guardian) Life Insurance Company Building directly across the avenue, forms an imposing terminus to Park Avenue South.

The Development of Union Square

The Commissioners Map of 1807-11, which first laid out the grid plan of Manhattan above Houston Street, allowed for certain existing thoroughfares to retain their original configuration. Bloomingdale Road, (now Broadway), and the Bowery intersected at 16th Street.

The acute angle formed by this "union" was set aside by the Commissioners and named Union Place.

Initially Union Place extended from 10th to 17th Streets, on land owned by the Manhattan Bank:

It then presented to the eye of the tourist and pedestrian a shapeless and ill-looking collection of lots, where garden sauce flourished — devoid of symmetry, and around which were reared a miserable group of shanties.

In 1815, the state legislature reduced the size of Union Place by making 14th Street its southern boundary. As the city expanded northward and land use intensified, the need for open spaces became apparent. A report drafted by the street committee in 1831 states the need for public squares "for purposes of military, and civic parades, and festivities, and ... to serve as ventilators to a densely populated city."

Designated a public space in 1832 at the urging of local residents, additional land was acquired so that the area could be regularized.

Graded, paved, and fenced, Union Place was finally opened to the public in July, 1839. Throughout much of its history, the square has been used for public gatherings, political rallies, and demonstrations.

By the 1850s, Union Square (as it came to be known) was completely surrounded by buildings including some of the city's most splendid mansions; but, "already by 1860, the dramatic march of commerce had begun." Theaters, hotels, and luxury retailers predominated in the 1870s. By the 1890s, the vestiges of the fashionable residential area, as well as the elegant stores and theaters, had been supplanted on Union Square by taller buildings that catered to the needs of publishers and manufacturers who had moved uptown.

The land on which the Everett Building stands was originally part of Cornelius Tiebout's farm. From 1853 on, the site was occupied by the Everett House, a hotel frequented by the singers and musicians performing at the new opera house, the Academy of Music (1854, architect Alexander Saeltzer).

Like the Belvedere and the Clarendon, hotels which were also demolished to make way for 'modern' office and loft buildings, the Everett House was razed to clear the site for the Everett Building.

The Everett Building is prominently situated on the northwest corner of East 17th Street and Union Square North, at the base of Park Avenue South (then called Fourth Avenue). Stations for major subway, surface, and "El" lines were close to the site, which was characterized by Real Estate Record & Guide in 1908 as "one of the most accessible locations for modern office buildings in the city."

Although when built, the Everett Building was associated with a possible transformation of Union Square to be effected by the construction of a new courthouse, the building was later seen as evidence of the concentration of the silk, woolen, cotton, and dry goods trades on Fourth Avenue, the area around the Square and lateral streets.

By September, 1910, about seventeen new loft and office buildings (generally restricted to office and salesroom needs, as opposed to manufacturing) had been erected, conveniently located near hotels and transportation.

In October 1911, Real Estate Record & Guide noted that "the Everett Building and those along the avenue, in which dry goods people are tenants, are all filled up.&









extended length drapes








extended length drapes




House of the Dead OVERKILL - Extended Cut






It's survival horror as it's never been seen before! The House of the Dead: Overkill is a pulp-style take on the classic SEGA light-gun shooter series. The game takes place as Special Agent G -- the hero of The House Of The Dead series -- is given his first assignment fresh out of the AMS academy. Teamed up with hard-boiled Detective Washington, they are sent to investigate stories of mysterious disappearances in small-town Louisiana. Little do they know what blood-soaked mutant depravity awaits them in the streets and swamps of Bayou City. The Extended Cut of The House of the Dead: Overkill presents the game for the first time in full HD with 3D support and PlayStation Move compatibility on the PlayStation 3 computer entertainment system.With all seven stages of the original re-mastered and two brand new scenarios added to this gruesome shooter, the 'baddest' just got bigger!

When a hard-boiled agent and a fresh graduate of the academy team up with a lone stripper named Varla Guns to investigate a series of mysterious disappearances in small-town Louisiana, little do they know what lies in store. In the streets and swamps of Bayou City awaits a horror unlike any they could imagine. Arm yourself with an arsenal of weapons and get ready to shoot your way to survival as hordes of zombies descend in this Extended Cut of The House of the Dead: Overkill.
The House of the Dead Overkill Extended Cut
Featuring new levels
Featuring new levels
Use Playstations motion sensing Move
Use Playstations motion
sensing Move
Fight against hordes of enemies
Fight against hordes of enemies
Synopsis
The House of the Dead: Overkill Extended Cut deposits you in a retro, B movie-style world crawling with monstrous zombies hungry for your brain. Rediscover the nightmare with seven remastered levels and two new exclusive levels, all in stunning 3D with remastered HD graphics. New baby mutants and a radical new crossbow with explosive bolts refresh the gameplay and add a whole new element of terror to the mutant-shooting fun. Mow down the rampaging zombies with your motion-sensing PlayStation Move controller or PlayStation Move Sharp Shooter. Blast the zombies in their tracks as you fight for your life and try to determine the horrific truth behind the blood-soaked mutant horror.
Key Features:
Extended Cut features new levels, weapons, mutants and more in stunning 3D and remastered HD graphics
Use your motion-sensing PlayStation Move controller or PlayStation Move Sharp Shooter to shoot down waves of marauding zombies hungry for brains (controller and Sharp Shooter not included)
Team up with a friend to play as Agent G and Agent Washington, who are investigating a series of disappearances and find a scene of blood-soaked mutant horror instead
See the pulp-style saga unfold in over-the-top horror similar to a classic B movie
Explore seven remastered levels from House of the Dead: Overkill and two brand-new exclusive levels that reveal an insane side story with two angry and armed strippers
Skewer new baby mutant enemies and original mutants alike with the new crossbow, which comes fully equipped with explosive bolts
Track your high scores in the new online leaderboards
Grab all the collectibles and PlayStation trophies in each level and try your hand at the new hardcore and single-weapon modes for added difficulty
For 1 to 2 players










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